Using Technology to Deepen Democracy, Using Democracy to Ensure Technology Benefits Us All

Sunday, September 30, 2018

Sunday Walk

I always say the same thing, a Sunday visit to our favorite diner on Piedmont Avenue then a stroll to one of our favorite places, this time one of our hikes through the back side of Mountain View cemetery, then scooped up some new kitten toys for Penny on the way back home. Tech neutrality gives way to cyberlibertarianism in my digital anti-democratization course, Critical Theory is all about Freud, psychoanalysis, and fetishism (some of his grossest most cisheteronormative stuff), then in Tuesday's grad seminar we turn from greenwashing design thinking to faux-democratizing design thinking via code. We're covering some of the same ground my digi class does so I'm hoping less prep may be necessary. Midterm grad reviews for my thesis students and grading papers is about to be larded on top of what has seemed a pretty demanding teaching term already. October is going to be a slog, possibly a good distraction from the crazymaking high stakes of the November elections looming ever closer from week to week...

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Emoluments Santa Claus?

via electoral-vote.com:
One wonders if Donald Trump is enjoying a few days where the microscope is trained on someone other than him. Certainly, it's allowed a few somewhat embarrassing stories to largely fly under the radar. One of these is a ruling that U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan issued on Friday, which says that a lawsuit that 200 Democratic senators and representatives filed against Trump, charging him with violating the Constitution's emoluments clause, can move forward. This day was bound to arrive sooner or later, once Trump decided not to divest himself of his business holdings. Given how vague the emoluments clause is... it is not clear that Trump has violated the Constitution. But it is also not clear that he hasn't. [He clearly has, ask Jimmy Carter --d] That makes it a matter for the courts; the only issue was finding someone who has standing to sue. Now, we've got that someone (and there's also a case filed by the Attorneys General of Maryland and D.C. that is likely to be allowed to proceed). So, we are going to find out exactly what the limits of the emoluments clause are (and, as a byproduct, Donald Trump's tax returns are likely to become a matter of public record). [bolded passages bolded by me --d]

Kavanoff

Grounds for impeachment, the fix is in, Republicans, right until the jig is up.
Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), the leading Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, told ABC News that if Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed as a Supreme Court justice, “the House will have to investigate” allegations of sexual assault and perjury if the Senate doesn’t “properly” do so through this week’s limited FBI probe. Said Nadler: “We can’t have a justice on the court who has been credibly accused of sexual assault, who’s been accused of other things, including perjury.”

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Friday, September 28, 2018

Roosevelt Institute On Reviving Antitrust

Roosevelt Institute and Great Democracy Initiative Release Legislative Blueprint for Combating the Second Gilded Age (follow the link to explore the various papers described here, especially that last piece about regulating tech platform monopolies):
As concentrated corporate power threatens jobs and wages and worsens inequality, the Roosevelt Institute and the Great Democracy Initiative (GDI) today released two new papers outlining a progressive framework to reform America’s failing antitrust system. Addressing key elements of the growing monopoly problem, the first report argues for taking antitrust policymaking out of the courts and empowering antitrust enforcers, while the second offers an alternative to the outdated consumer welfare standard, along with policy solutions to increase competition and protect workers and consumers. Together, the papers provide a progressive blueprint for a robust 21st century antitrust regime that can begin to address the United States’ market power crisis.

In Taking Antitrust Away From the Courts: A Structural Approach to Reversing the Second Age of Monopoly Power, Ganesh Sitaraman, Director of Policy and Co-Founder of the Great Democracy Initiative, explains the problems with court-established antitrust policy and outlines a set of institutional reforms to the Federal Trade Commission in order to reinvigorate antitrust policymaking. In shifting the policymaking role from judges, who have eroded existing regulations, to agency experts, Sitaraman recommends a series of bold policy reforms, including a newly empowered anti-monopoly agency, new standards and practices for merger evaluation, and expanded third party enforcement.

“Antitrust laws are only as good as their implementation and enforcement,” said Ganesh Sitaraman, Director of Policy and Co-Founder of the Great Democracy Initiative, and a Professor of Law at Vanderbilt Law School. “As our growing market power problem demonstrates, leaving antitrust policymaking to the courts does not work. We need a strong antitrust agency with the authority to take action that promotes competition and addresses market concentration.”

A second paper, The Effective Competition Standard: A New Standard for Antitrust, tackles the dangerous implications of the ambiguous and inadequate consumer welfare standard. Authored by Roosevelt Institute economist Marshall Steinbaum and Maurice E. Stucke, a Professor of Law at the University of Tennessee, the report argues in favor of a new effective competition standard. If adopted, this framework would protect competition in the economy, including in the labor market and throughout supply chains, by meeting several essential goals:

1) to protect individuals, purchasers, consumers, and producers;

2) to preserve opportunities for competitors;

3) to promote individual autonomy and well-being; and

4) to disperse and de-concentrate private power.

“The current antitrust standard is not working. Market power and monopsony have been growing in our economy for decades and are a major factor driving wage stagnation and decreasing worker protections,” said Marshall Steinbaum, Fellow and Research Director at the Roosevelt Institute. “Antitrust enforcers need tools to hold corporate power accountable and to better prioritize the interests of consumers and workers.”

The Roosevelt Institute has been a leading voice on antitrust policy and the need for bold policies to tackle market power. Roosevelt Chief Economist Joseph E. Stiglitz recently called for a new standard for antitrust during his keynote address at the ongoing FTC competition hearings. In 2018, the Roosevelt Institute released Powerless: How Lax Antitrust and Concentrated Market Power Rig the Economy Against American Workers, Consumers, and Communities, which outlines the 40-year assault on antitrust and competition policy. In 2018, Steinbaum also authored an issue brief titled A Missing Link: The Role of Antitrust Law in Rectifying Employer Power in Our High-Profit, Low-Wage Economy, which chronicled the ways the market power crisis is limiting worker power, depressing wages, and harming the economy. The Great Democracy Initiative has also championed progressive solutions to today’s skewed economy. In 2018, GDI released Regulating Tech Platforms: A Blueprint for Reform, which identified ways to break up and regulate technology platforms.

Working Not Working

Spent yesterday putting together teaching requests for next academic year (a nicely bolstering conceit, the thought of me teaching theory to students from around the world in an art school over a century old in San Francisco overlooking the Bay, next year, in a school, a City, a country, a world still managing to exist with all of us still on it...) and prepping my Freud lecture for next Monday (ditto). Today, I meant to read work from my thesis students today and start prepping discussion of texts assigned in cyberlibertarian ideology for my digital anti-democratization course... but I find myself drifting, disgusted, demoralized, dreading what comes next. The Kavanaugh hearing is unbearable, the brazenness of the power-grab, the baldness of the hypocrisy, the spectacle they are making of their eagerness for revenge, their salivation at the prospect of dismantling rights and protections is truly terrifying (and no, I am not "surprised," this isn't an expression of surprise, this is, as I said, an expression of disgust at the disgusting, one in a long line like everybody else's long line, this is why I don't really blog anymore...). Anyway, feeling grossed out and scared for the millionth time these last few years. When I was younger, these feelings would have activated me, made me sharp and loud and ferocious, but now I just feel exhausted and anxious and so sad. I truly fear the upcoming mid-terms are the last comparatively easy chance we have of turning the tide or beginning to turn the tide within our living generation in the ongoing cold civil war of deadly extractive white supremacist cisheteronormative corporate-militarism against the rising sustainable equitable democratic multiculture to a hot war of the utterly disenfranchised majority against fascists and their collaborators. The last chance before that was the election of the flawed, dreary, historically encumbered but conspicuously preferable HRC over the obviously bigoted, incompetent, authoritarian criminal Trump and we failed that one, so I'm not nearly as confident as some seem to be that we will pass the test of the mid-terms any better than the last one (especially given that unprecedented levels of disenfranchisement, gerrymandering, and foreign interference will mean privileged white voters, a majority of whom obviously cannot be trusted to vote for decency and sense, will have a disproportionate say in the outcome as usual).

Today's Random Wilde

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Today's Random Wilde

One should never listen. To listen is a sign of indifference to one's hearers.

Zing Ding Ding

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Bonus: Barbara Lee Speaks For Me On Voter Registration Day

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Monday, September 24, 2018

Long Teaching Day

Off to the City soon, to teach my two undergraduate lectures back to back for six hours. Marxism and racist and/or market fundamentalist fantasies of "tech neutrality" will be the topics. Already tired, though my opinions on these subjects are passionate. Politics is a flabbergasting shitshow, I'm still not recovered from Dad's death and the familial chaos it has engendered, and in general I am still not in the world's best shape, forever battling at the edge of sleep deprivation, pervasive anxiety, and irritable depression. Clawing my way to modest pleasures, walks with Eric, watching Dr. Who and detective shows and cooking competitions, reading and talking theory with engaged students... even when the world is bleak and day to day challenges are painfully intense, life is well worth living and love a miracle to cherish.

Sunday, September 23, 2018

Sunday Walk

Another long beautiful walk with Eric this Sunday, beginning with brunch at our favorite diner, the Piedmont Street Cafe and Bakery, then a long stroll through St. Mary's cemetery -- the rather shaggier neighbor to the posh Mountainview Cemetery next door -- where in over a mile's exploration we encountered just a single car and one other couple the whole time, walking their beagle. Still amazed by the sublime outdoor spaces bathing in sunlight and bristling with blooms that are ignored by throngs within walking distance here in my wonderful beloved City of Oakland. Can't say exactly why but so far I am not too nervous about upcoming teaching -- tomorrow I'm introducing my critical theory survey course to Marx(isms) and then my digital anti-democratization class is going to talk about "net neutrality," so-called, and read some Zeynep Tufekci and Frank Pasquale to go with last week's Safiya Noble. I get the feeling that the digi-demos wants less lecture and more hands-on workshopping, so I'm crafting in-class exercises for them -- these don't always cover quite as much ground, but the energy they generate often seems to help students retain more of what we do manage to cover. In my grad design thinking critique seminar we're weaving environmental justice and eco-socialist critiques of "bright" greens and "natural capitalists" (so-called) and this will lead us into a discussion of geo-engineering discourse. All topics I've gone on about a million times before, in class after class (not to mention a million old blog posts here).

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Friday, September 21, 2018

Strategies to Rebuild Worker Power for the Global Economy

In Seven Strategies to Rebuild Worker Power for the 21st Century Global Economy, Roosevelt [Institute] Fellow Todd N. Tucker uses historical lessons to lay out a framework for how to rebuild worker power and fight inequality, starting with a global labor agreement—what Tucker calls the Worker Power Agreement—modeled on the Paris Climate Accords. The report argues for governments to take on explicit targets to increase union density, as well as complementary policies that our trading partners make use of, including:

    Privileging firms that cooperate well with unions;
    Making labor law enforcement more favorable toward labor;
    Extending union contracts to non-union workers;
    Structurally incorporating unions into the policymaking process;
    Allowing unions to manage public benefits; and
    Making union membership the default status for workers.

Recent Supreme Court decisions like Janus v. AFSCME reveal that the state (of which courts are a part) can and does put its thumb on the scale against labor. Thus, policy could instead actively tilt the other way. This paper proposes a fundamental re-visioning of the role of government in rebuilding worker power, which has a stronger foothold when it benefits from more than just one base of support. Instead of defeatist resignation, modest legal changes, or waiting for unions to save themselves, Tucker recommends ambitious and linked strategies at the international and domestic level to strengthen labor institutions across the globe.

Today's Random Wilde

No man is rich enough to buy back his past.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

The critic has to educate the public; the artist has to educate the critic.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

Genius is born -- not paid.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Abolish Environmental Racism

"The iron law of climate change is: the less you did to cause it, the more likely you are to pay the price." -- Bill McKibben

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Monday, September 17, 2018

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

A Hard Day Ahead

It's my long teaching day, six hours of lecture in a row are looming. Even if it's Nietzsche and Safiya Noble I'm talking about, this will be a slog. My brother called last night to let me know our father has died. He was just 79 years old. Long expected -- he has suffered from Alzheimer's nearly eight years, he hasn't recognized even close family for a couple of years now, and lately he has had some tough accidents -- and in the context of a longer political estrangement as he went from the supportive if confused pro-gay Southern bible-study Christian with whom I lived in Atlanta for a while right after college to being a supremely upsetting Fox News viewer later in our lives. I am remembering his earlier gentleness now, his insecurities, and the efforts he made to connect to his weird queer hyper-intellectual self-righteous son. Nights before my long teaching day are never easy -- I skip the cannabis assist that makes sleep a snap on other nights, and I'm always already nervous as hell anyway before a performance -- but last night I'd be surprised if I managed as much as three hours' sleep. Reminds me of the bad old insomnia nights of last winter -- but it's surely temporary. Still, I'm feeling rather bruised and bleary for the beginning of a long demanding day. We'll see how this goes.

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Sunday Walk

Another long walk with Eric through sunny bucolic neighborhoods, blue skies and golden light and fading flowers, with a lettace-crisp breeze to keep us company, from brunch at our Piedmont Avenue Diner and Bakery to a quiet contemplation of our favorite big city rose garden, as beautiful as always and mostly with the whole place to ourselves. Mean to spend the rest of this afternoon prepping Nietzsche and internet history, from Standage and Lessig to Safiya Noble. I'm usually a bundle of nerves Sundays before my long teaching day, stage-fright and worries about being underprepared plague me as always, interfering all too much with the straightforward pleasures of connecting with students over interesting ideas and problems together. Since my hospitalization and then the ongoing Trumpmerican clusterfuck I've had a hard time clawing my way back to comfort and confidence in the classroom, tho' I'm back to fitness and sleeping better at any rate these days, and hope a string of successful courses will nudge me back to the pleasures I long took in teaching before this more recent couple years of distress.

Saturday, September 15, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

The mystery of love is greater than the mystery of death.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Friday, September 14, 2018

Prep...

Spent the day prepping my Nietzsche lecture for next week. For tomorrow, prepping to teach a material/practical history of what gets called "the internet." The next day? Green urbanities for my grad seminar "Designs on Us." Already, my thesis students are clamoring for meetings and students are eager to plan studio visits. Fall term really is something of a breezing buzzing confusion.

Today's Random Wilde

Nowadays we are all of us so hard up that the only pleasant things to pay are compliments. They're the only things we can pay.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

The mystery of love is greater than the mystery of death.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Shorter Teaching Day

Classes went well yesterday, this year's students seem comparatively more talkative than in recent years past, and this makes lectures more engaging. Still, the back to back lectures were demanding, and I returned home late and quite exhausted. Mondays are going to be a slog. In my graduate seminar today we turn to sustainable design discourse, Viridians, biomimicry, cradle-to-cradle, permaculture. Most of this stuff amounts to greenwashing in my opinion, but I do find Wes Jackson and the Land Institute interesting and inspiring at any rate. The Bruce Sterling Viridian stuff has not aged well at all, I am finding. My notes are far more sparse and my expectations looser for the grad seminar, today's at any rate. We'll see how the conversation unfolds...

Today's Random Wilde

To recommend thrift to the poor is both grotesque and insulting. It is like advising a man who is starving to eat less.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Monday, September 10, 2018

Long Teaching Day

Fontenelle, Kant, DuBois, Wilde, Jefferson, Barlow, Butler, and who knows who else? Lecturing from one to seven, more or less non-stop today. Should be home by 9.30. Then it's dinner and right to bed, because I'm teaching again tomorrow and need to do prep in the morning before it's off to the City again. Mondays are going to be a bear this Fall. Imagine, I'll still be at this past the mid-terms. Things may be looking a bit different by the end of term in this country. Or not.

Sunday, September 09, 2018

Another World Is Possible...

Sunday Walk

Beautiful long walk after brunch at our favorite Piedmont Street diner this afternoon, walking the crest of Mountain View Cemetery, "Millionaire's Row," where vast castles and pyramids and orientalist temples mingle before the most stunning views of Oakland and San Francisco and Berkeley and the endless stretch of blue Bay and blue sky to match... last week Eric Mom's and stepmom visited (I happen to feel much closer to and more congenial with Eric's family than my own, I'll admit) and we skipped our weekly jaunt, making our return to form that much more edifying today, creatures of habit that we are. The sun was hot as it has felt for months, and yet there was a real autumnal twang in the air as well. Trees and shrubs are settling in a bit, shadows seem already to be lengthening... Monday's are my long teaching day this term, two undergraduate lectures back to back, about three hours each, a survey of critical theory imparting so much information it feels exhausting to teach on its own, and then a topical course on digital anti-democratization via cyberlibertarianism (in David Golumbia's felicitous phrase) which is of course still urgent, but these days a topic that I feel a bit burned out about even as I keep flogging my usual anti-futurological critiques. The stage-fright and preparation worries (both over and under) are pretty ferocious the day before, so our long walks are an especially welcome distraction and grounding calm as I set out to look over my notes one more time before launching into the exactions of teacher-mode.   

Saturday, September 08, 2018

Keep Fighting for the Prison Strike Agenda


Elonging

The "thought leaders" of tech fleecing their fandoms like evangelists fleecing their flocks...

Today's Random Wilde

In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Friday, September 07, 2018

More On A Public Banking Option

Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mark Paul and Assistant Professor of Economics at Loyola Marymount University Thomas Herndon make the case for a public banking option, emphasizing the historical precedent set by President Franklin D. Roosevelt: “A forgotten lesson of the New Deal era is that a public option for basic services can both ensure universal access and empower regulators to curtail abuses. In the case of consumer finance, a public bank would go a long way toward improving the economic security of all U.S. households.”
Apart from and a part of urgent ongoing abolition struggles -- struggles to abolish white supremacy and patriarchy, pollution and waste, police brutality, prisons, nuclear weapons, illiteracy, homelessness, food insecurity, neglected treatable diseases and malnutrition, corruption, and so much more -- the work to provide a public option for banking (in part, I hope, via an expanded postal service), a public option for healthcare (in part via Medicare buy-in and Medicaid expansion), public options for internet and phone and streaming services (in part via community co-ops and expanded commercial-free national public radio and television programs with fairness doctrines and regulations against deceptive and fraudulent advertising and misinformation practices), public alternatives for sustainable energy, transportation, and food provision (mostly through co-ops and infrastructure and organic/permaculture farms and farmer's markets built and maintained and subsidized via full guaranteed public employment at a living wage programs -- not the basic income re-feudalization scam advocated by oligarchic "thought leaders" of tech) is looking like the work of the rising generation with whatever help my own eclipsed ineffectual dwindling generation can provide them as they rise in their diversity, awareness, rage, and promise.

Today's Random Wilde

The truth is rarely pure and never simple.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Thursday, September 06, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

The only thing that one really knows about human nature is that it changes. Change is the one quality we can predicate of it. The systems that fail are those that rely on the permanency of human nature, and not on its growth and development.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

India Strikes Down Sodomy Laws and Endorses Principle of Equal Treatment for LGBTQ People

Nico Lang for Into
It’s official: India has struck down its century-old law criminalizing gay sex. In a historic verdict announced Thursday, a five-judge panel ruled Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code is unconstitutional. First enacted during British rule in the 1860s, the colonial codes outlaw “unnatural offenses… against the order of nature.” All four opinions submitted to the court were concurring, showing unanimous agreement. Justices concluded LGBTQ people are guaranteed equal treatment under the constitution and that anti-gay discrimination violates freedom of expression.
Joyful images of joy (for example, these via Buzzfeed) bring me joy. Nice to remember, how marvelous joy is. This is great news, and there is a big rolling world for the rising, secularizing, diversifying, greening, abolition-democratizing American coalition to join up with as we destroy the last vestiges of cisheteronormative white supremacist authoritarian extractive-industrial corporate-militarism here in sick sad Trumpworld.

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

Tuesday, September 04, 2018

Teaching Today

Labor Day gloriously nixed my long teaching day yesterday, today's grad seminar is a companion (illustration, contextualization, elaboration) to the general maps of the conceptual terrain I offered up in my introductory lecture last week: we'll be discussing Jenny Anderson's, "The Great Future Debate and the Struggle for the World" on Cold War futurological think-tankification; Lee Vinsel's amusing polemic, "Design Thinking Is Sort of Like Syphilis: It's Contagious And Rots Your Brain" on a generation of unnovative think-leadership and white upward failure in the Valley of the Silly Con, then Wendy Hui Kyong Chun's wonderful useful and clarifying, "Race And/As Technology," which in turn takes up Martin Heidegger's, "The Question Concerning Technology" (which I'll be connecting to Arendt, natch) and then William Gibson's first published story (and a manifesto of sorts), "The Gernsback Continuum" on retro-futurity and present-as-future sfnal dystopia with a chrome sharkfin. I have an order in mind (I just offered it, as it happens) and a set of pet concerns to emphasize, but who knows what the community of the classroom will fixate on or be provoked by or fall in love with? Should be an interesting seminar.

Today's Random Wilde

Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live, it is asking others to live as one wishes to live.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Coming Crisis Blogging...

It's close to conventional wisdom by now. Here is Eugene Robinson in the Washington Post:
Trump has been able to get away with the political equivalent of murder largely because the Republican-led Congress protects him, refusing to do its constitutional duty. It won’t call him on his many lies; it won’t investigate his financial conflicts of interest; it won’t hold his Cabinet members accountable; and with the exception thus far of the Senate Intelligence Committee, it won’t even seriously investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election. House committees led by Democrats would do all of these things and more. The most immediate threat to Trump from the election is not impeachment, though we may eventually reach that point. Rather, it is the prospect of genuine oversight and serious investigation. Scrutiny is Trump’s kryptonite. The other thing Trump fears, of course, is the Robert S. Mueller III investigation writ large. The probe by the special counsel has now metastasized to involve the Southern District of New York, the New York state attorney general and the Manhattan district attorney. Trump’s former campaign chairman was convicted on eight felony counts, and his former personal lawyer pleaded guilty to eight felonies — on the same day. Trump’s longtime accountant and a tabloid publisher who kept Trump’s secrets locked in a safe are talking to prosecutors under grants of immunity. Nothing in Trump’s history suggests he is going to sit back and let this process unfold — and perhaps destroy him. Everyone should assume this will get ugly. [Emphasis mine.--d] Trump desperately wants an attorney general who will shut Mueller down. The incumbent, Jeff Sessions, cannot do so because he is recused from the matter. Republican senators who once warned Trump not to dare fire Sessions now seem resigned to the fact that Trump will do just that. It makes sense for Trump to make his move after the election. [Don't count on it, then.--d] If Republicans still control Congress, he’ll get away with it. If Democrats take charge, he won’t. If anyone asks you what’s at stake in November, tell them democracy and justice.

Monday, September 03, 2018

Labor Day Adjunct Organizing Read

via In These Times: These Faculty Organizing Victories Show Labor Doesn’t Need the Courts On Its Side

Today's Random Wilde

Work is the curse of the drinking classes.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily

Saturday, September 01, 2018

Today's Random Wilde

People who count their chickens before they are hatched act very wisely because chickens run about so absurdly that it's impossible to count them accurately.

Barbara Lee Speaks For Me Daily