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Friday, October 31, 2008

Bush's Last Ditch Orgy of Destruction

This is who they are.

[via Washington Post]
The White House is working to… weaken government rules aimed at protecting consumers and the environment, before President Bush leaves office in January.

The new rules would be among the most controversial deregulatory steps of the Bush era and could be difficult for his successor to undo. Some would ease or lift constraints on private industry, including power plants, mines and farms.

Those and other regulations would help clear obstacles to some commercial ocean-fishing activities, ease controls on emissions of pollutants that contribute to global warming, relax drinking-water standards and lift a key restriction on mountaintop coal mining.

Once such rules take effect, they typically can be undone only through a laborious new regulatory proceeding, including lengthy periods of public comment, drafting and mandated reanalysis.

Seen in the context of the recent Bush cross-border provocations in the Middle East and the hyperbolic pre-emptive belligerence of the new amplified Bush Doctrine (which more or less declares war on every nation in the world, including nations that do not yet exist) I think it is safe to say that we see in these last unchecked and uncheckable efforts to enact their program a confirmation of our worst fears about the Movement Republicanism that originated in the Nixonian-Reaganist epoch and has found its earthshattering consummation in the Gingrich-Bush II epoch: A pure expression of the worst impulses human beings are capable of, a will to domination and short-sighted gain without attention to consequences, and a consequent harvest of misery, lawlessness, and destruction.

1 comment:

Martin said...

You'd think, given the state of the economy and Bush's enormous disapproval ratings, he might realize that maybe, just maybe, he was doing something wrong. But he, as always, appears to be impervious to facts.

The great thing about research is that you are humbled by your stupidity on a daily basis. It is a continual process of committing errors and changing strategies. Maybe that's why I rarely make strong assertions about anything. If smart people have challenges with simplified systems, what do any of us really know about complex problems like global warming, economic meltdowns, geopolitical dynamics, or health care distribution?